The BBC is claiming that they may start broadcasting Muslim prayers to reflect the growing Muslim demographic that is starting to shape a once great British island, into a European Mecca.

The BBC claims that its religious leanings are often too Christian and do not reflect the increasing multiculturalism that is shaping European nations, forced upon them by the open border policies of the leftist socialist European Union.

In an article that was published by The Telegraph on Sunday it goes on to report the recent move by the BBC. The article reads in part,

The BBC’s religious output is too Christian, an internal review by the Corporation has concluded, opening the way for more programmes on other faiths.

A report by Aaqil Ahmed, the BBC’s head of religion and ethics, has suggested Muslim, Hindu and Sikh faiths should get more airtime.

One Muslim leader suggested the review could lead to Friday prayers from a mosque being broadcast in the same way that Christian church services currently feature in the BBC’s schedules.

The report is now being considered by Lord Hall, the director general, who could make changes to make religious output less “disproportionate”, the Sunday Times (£) reported.

Mr Ahmed told a Commons meeting on religious literacy he had written a report for Lord Hall that would answer criticisms from non-Christian faiths that they were under-served.

Mr Ahmed said in a statement: “Christianity remains the cornerstone of our output and there are more hours dedicated to it than there are to other faiths.

In yet another news article that was published by Breitbart News also on Sunday it goes on to suggest that perhaps the Church of England agrees with the BBC that in fact, the BBC does show too many Christian shows and not enough Islamic shows.

The Breitbart news article states that,

The BBC has concluded Christianity features too prominently in its religious output in an internal review, insisting other faiths be given more airtime and resources.

Both the Church of England and the Muslim Council of Britain (MCB) – who are linkedto the pro-international Caliphate group Muslim Brotherhood – appeared to welcome the findings, with the later calling for Friday prayers to be broadcast.

According to the Times, Lord Hall, the director-general, is now considering what to do about the apparently problematic findings – that there is a disproportionate amount televised Christianity in a historically Christian country.

Aaqil Ahmed, the BBC’s Muslim head of religion and ethics, has told a committee in the House of Commons that he has written a report on how to satisfy the demands for more third world religions on the BBC.

Asked whether greater coverage of other faiths could lead to cuts in Christian coverage, the BBC could not confirm what programmes were safe.

In a statement, Mr. Ahmed added: “We do look at the number of hours we produce, and measure that against the religious make-up of society. We also carry out checks to give us a better understanding of how we represent the different faiths across the various BBC channels and services.

“Christianity remains the cornerstone of our output and there are more hours dedicated to it than there are to other faiths. Our output in this area is not static, though. It has evolved over the years and we regularly assess it.”

The Church of England said faith was growing and changing worldwide, and “resources to explore religious world views”, including and other than Christianity, would be needed.

“Any comprehensive review needs to move beyond arguments of mere proportionality to embrace the need not only for greater religious literacy but also increased resources to explore religious world views.”

However, the former Archbishop of Canterbury, Lord Carey, gave the prospect of increased coverage of other faiths a “guarded welcome”.

He warned: “I don’t think our liberal establishment appreciates what Christianity has done for the nation, and how much of a bedrock it is for democracy and the values we believe in. There is a real feeling by Christians of being let down by the Establishment. Christianity is fighting for its life in western countries.”

The BBC claims that a report shows that a disproportionate number of Christian shows are being broadcasted by the BBC, compared with television productions aimed at people who practice Islam.

In an article for Politics Home it goes on to report,

Director General Lord Hall is apparently considering a report on the subject written by the BBC’s head of religion and ethics Aaqil Ahmed.

The corporation broadcasts religious shows such as Songs of Praise, Sunday Morning Live, The Life of Muhammad, and Thought for the Day, which showcase different religions.

In a statement, Mr Ahmed said: “We do look at the number of hours we produce, and measure that against the religious make-up of society.

“We also carry out checks to give us a better understanding of how we represent the different faiths across the various BBC channels and services.

“Christianity remains the cornerstone of our output and there are more hours dedicated to it than there are to other faiths.

“Our output in this area is not static, though. It has evolved over the years and we regularly assess it.”

Ibrahim Mogra, of the Muslim Council of Britain, suggested the BBC could broadcast prayers from a mosque, among other ideas but added: “We would not wish Christians to have any less exposure.”

The BBC has also recently come under fire from recent news articles published that claim to report that the BBC will not hire White interns, saying they have too many White employees and would only hire minorities for internship positions.

Just eight days ago Breitbart News published an article entitled, “Whites Need Not Apply: BBC Advertises ‘Black, Asian, Or Minority’-Only Positions” The Breitbart article reads in part,

A range of British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) television departments, programmes, and radio stations are currently offering highly desirable, paid internships, but white people are prohibited from applying.

Creative Access – an organisation, registered as a charity, which offers placements at “many of the UK’s top media organisations” – has listed a number of BBC placements on its website, demanding applicants are only from “Black, Asian and non-white minority ethnic backgrounds”.

The website’s list of opportunities shows that all but four of the positions currently available are for jobs at the publicly funded BBC, and Creative Access is funded by the British tax payer despite its charity status.

This anti-Christian and anti-White stance that the BBC proposes to make will cause blowback and backlash among their readers. Stop forcing multiculturalism and Islam. Just because a few people would like a global open-border society, the vast majority of the rest of us on this planet do not.