Police and prosecutors attempted to keep the identity and possible homosexuality of a British jihadist a secret to protect his human rights, it has been reported.

Officers and the Crown Prosecution Service were concerned that should details surrounding Aseel Muthana emerge during a trial of his friends who helped him join Isil it would put his life at risk.

They believed they still had a duty of care under human rights laws to protect the teenager, even though he had run off to join a terror group intent on attacking this country.

The concerns centred on a series of text messages between Muthana, now 19, and Forhad Rahman, 21, who helped pay for him to travel to the war zone in February 2014.

Language in the messages left their “sexuality open to interpretation” after Rahman described Cardiff man Muthana as a “Welsh cutie”.

The pair only met online two months before Muthana left but formed a “profound emotional closeness” and called each other “cutie”, “honey” and “babe” in messages.

With Isil known to murder gay men and women, prosecutors initially discussed the need for reporting restrictions either on Muthana’s name or the details of the messages.

Muthana’s brother Nasser was already in Syria and later appeared in one of Isil’s first propaganda videos in which he encouraged others to join him.

In the end, it could not be ascertained whether Muthana was gay or not and the evidence was not subject to any court order.

But during the preliminary legal argument, a CPS note read: “It is not known what the reaction of ISIS would be if they became of aware of the social media chat that Mr Muthana has entered into with the defendants. It seems unlikely that Mr Muthana would have an opportunity to defend himself in accordance with the standards of this court.”

It said the CPS and police had a “duty” under the Human Rights Act to protect him and that “does not end because Mr Muthana has left the UK or is fighting on behalf of ISIS.”

In a pre-trial briefing, the then assistant chief constable of South Wales Police Nikki Holland, who is now at Merseyside Police, said: “I don’t think it is a case of physically protecting him but he has protection of the law in human rights. He has a right to life. As a police force we protect everyone’s right to life – even a terrorist.

Very good statement from the police, why are they protecting him if homosexual is good. This is what the government has to think about, the judgement of the Lord is coming and no one can protect a human right except the right of God and repentance. (Proverbs 12:21) No harm overtakes the righteous, but the wicked have their fill of trouble. The nation needs to repent and come out from their rights and seek the right of the Holy Spirit.

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Written by TCE Global News